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Wednesday, November 4, 2020 - 08:30 to Wednesday, January 6, 2021 - 17:30

Applications for the RII Core Facilities Pilot Program are now being accepted through UA Competition Space. The CFPP is designed to support three key types of activity within the RII-managed core facilities. Each CFPP proposal will be evaluated on scientific merit and feasibility, and should focus on one or more of the following activity types:

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Wednesday, October 28, 2020 - 19:00 to Monday, November 16, 2020 - 19:00

The UA Microscopy Alliance website (http://microscopy.arizona.edu/) was built to make it easier for anyone to find the core facilities, microscopes, and experts on the UA campus. The website launched in the fall of 2013 and we are getting ready to build the next generation of the website.

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Thursday, September 24, 2020 - 14:30 to Thursday, October 22, 2020 - 17:30

Leica Microsystems will be offering an on-site demonstration of their newest confocal, the Stellaris 5. The instument, in addition to XYZ and wavelength (spectral) resolution, offers TauSense which measures fluorescence lifetime resolution.

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Wednesday, July 29, 2020 - 13:15 to Friday, August 7, 2020 - 14:30

The constant improvement in quality and size of microscopic datasets, especially from 3D electron microscopy, leads to an increasing need for accurate, repeatable, and reliable image visualization and analysis.

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Tuesday, June 23, 2020 - 11:15 to Wednesday, July 8, 2020 - 11:30

Teledyne Photometrics will be hosting a Remote Learning Workshop. This is a interactive workshop, covering basic principles of scientific imaging (sensitivity, resolution, quantum efficiency, sources of noise, etc.) and an introduction to camera technology (CCD, EMCCD, sCMOS, back-illuminated sensors, etc.) with a live camera demonstration of these principles (time permitting). This workshop will also allow researchers to understand which camera specifications are important for specific imaging applications. 

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Monday, June 15, 2020 - 09:45 to Thursday, June 18, 2020 - 14:45

Digital images are scientific data, with many of the same strengths and weaknesses as other types of instrument-acquired information. Unfortunately, scientists rarely receive formal training in how to appropriately work with image data. This can lead to image processing mistakes or the use of unscientific folklore which has been handed down as knowledge. As problematic as these kinds of errors may be for science, it is when the line is crossed from “honest error” to fraud that is of major concern for the entire scientific community.

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